Defense mechanisms test

Jei
2019-02-25 21:25:08
990
Defense mechanisms test

Developed by Plutchik and Kellerman, the Life Style Index is a 92-item questionnaire with statements to which the test-taker responds "usually true" or "usually not true." From these responses, scores for eight defence mechanisms are derived, including compensation, denial, displacement, intellectualization, projection, reaction formation, regression, and repression. Four of these are combinations of several other defences. For example, scores for the defense of compensation include identification and fantasy; scores for the intellectualization consist of responses to items assessing rationalization, undoing, and sublimation. 

Give sincere and direct answers to these 92 statements and find out which defence mechanism you have! Ready? Let's get started!

I'm easy to communicate with

Usually true

Usually not true

I sleep more than most people I know

Usually true

Usually not true

In my life, there always have been people I Iooked up to

Usually true

Usually not true

When I'm being medically treated, I want to know every detail of my treatment

Usually true

Usually not true

When I want something, I can’t wait to get it

Usually true

Usually not true

I blush easily

Usually true

Usually not true

Self-possession is one of my biggest merits

Usually true

Usually not true

Sometimes I just want to punch a hole through the wall

Usually true

Usually not true

I lose my temper easily

Usually true

Usually not true

I get mad when someone accidentally pushes me

Usually true

Usually not true

I can't recall my dreams

Usually true

Usually not true

People that are commanding annoy me

Usually true

Usually not true

I often feel out of place

Usually true

Usually not true

I consider myself a fair person

Usually true

Usually not true

The more things I buy, the happier I am

Usually true

Usually not true

I often dream of being the center of attention

Usually true

Usually not true

The idea that my family members may walk around the house naked frustrates me

Usually true

Usually not true

People say I boast a lot

Usually true

Usually not true

I get suicidal thoughts when rejected

Usually true

Usually not true

I am admired by many people

Usually true

Usually not true

Sometimes I get so mad that I want to break and throw things

Usually true

Usually not true

I don't like gossipy people

Usually true

Usually not true

I always see a positive side of things

Usually true

Usually not true

I need to work harder than others to compensate for my flaws

Usually true

Usually not true

Sometimes I want the world to be destroyed by a nuclear bomb

Usually true

Usually not true

I have no biases

Usually true

Usually not true

People say I'm too impulsive

Usually true

Usually not true

I dislike people who always try to be the center of attention

Usually true

Usually not true

I don't like unkind people

Usually true

Usually not true

I do my best not to offend anyone

Usually true

Usually not true

I never cry

Usually true

Usually not true

I smoke a lot

Usually true

Usually not true

I find it hard to part with something that belongs to me

Usually true

Usually not true

I am not good at remembering faces

Usually true

Usually not true

Sometimes I masturbate

Usually true

Usually not true

I am not good at remembering last names

Usually true

Usually not true

I hate people who use whining and tears to get what they want

Usually true

Usually not true

Even if I'm right, I'm ready to listen to other people's opinions

Usually true

Usually not true

People never bore me

Usually true

Usually not true

I find it hard to sit still even for a moment

Usually true

Usually not true

I have few childhood memories

Usually true

Usually not true

I don't pay attention to negative traits of other people

Usually true

Usually not true

I think the situation in the world is much better than most people think

Usually true

Usually not true

People say I trust easily

Usually true

Usually not true

I don't like scandalous people

Usually true

Usually not true

I try to get rid of negative thoughts

Usually true

Usually not true

I'm an optimistic person

Usually true

Usually not true

I like to plan every little detail in advance

Usually true

Usually not true

Sometimes I overreact

Usually true

Usually not true

I get angry when things don’t go my way

Usually true

Usually not true

During an argument, I like to point out other people's mistakes

Usually true

Usually not true

I take challenges easily

Usually true

Usually not true

I don't like obscene films

Usually true

Usually not true

I get frustrated when I don't get enough attention

Usually true

Usually not true

People say I lack emotion

Usually true

Usually not true

I doubt my decisions

Usually true

Usually not true

If someone doubts me and my capabilities, I start showing off what I can do

Usually true

Usually not true

Sometimes I want to hit another car when I drive

Usually true

Usually not true

Most people irritate me because they are egoists

Usually true

Usually not true

I work while on vacation

Usually true

Usually not true

Some food makes me nauseous

Usually true

Usually not true

I gnaw my nails

Usually true

Usually not true

People say I avoid problems

Usually true

Usually not true

I like alcohol

Usually true

Usually not true

I don't like obscene jokes

Usually true

Usually not true

Sometimes I have bad dreams

Usually true

Usually not true

I don't like career-oriented people

Usually true

Usually not true

I lie a lot

Usually true

Usually not true

I hate pornography

Usually true

Usually not true

My bad temper causes me a lot of trouble

Usually true

Usually not true

I don't like people who are insincere

Usually true

Usually not true

When I get disappointed, I get frustrated

Usually true

Usually not true

I don't get bothered when I hear alarming news on TV

Usually true

Usually not true

I feel disgusted when touching something sticky or slithery

Usually true

Usually not true

When I'm in a good mood, I start behaving like a child

Usually true

Usually not true

I often argue with other people over nothing

Usually true

Usually not true

Dead people don’t cause me any discomfort

Usually true

Usually not true

I don't like people who crave for attention

Usually true

Usually not true

I find many people annoying

Usually true

Usually not true

I'm stressed when I have to shower/take a bath somewhere other than home

Usually true

Usually not true

I find it hard to even pronounce obscene words

Usually true

Usually not true

I get angry if I can't trust a person

Usually true

Usually not true

I really want others to talk about my sexual attractiveness

Usually true

Usually not true

It seems like I never finish anything I've started

Usually true

Usually not true

I wear nice clothes to look good

Usually true

Usually not true

I have better moral principles than most people I know

Usually true

Usually not true

During an argument, I say more logical things than my opponents

Usually true

Usually not true

Amoral people disgust me

Usually true

Usually not true

I get mad when someone accidentally pushes me

Usually true

Usually not true

I fall in love a lot

Usually true

Usually not true

People say I'm too non-biased

Usually true

Usually not true

I don’t get bothered when I see someone covered in blood

Usually true

Usually not true

Denial

Psychological denial is a common coping mechanism. Basically, denial is an attempt to reduce anxiety and worry by refusing to accept the reality. A woman may deny there is a lump in her breast. An overweight person may insist she is big-boned. Many overly optimistic and overly positive people, in fact, are using denial as their predominant coping strategy. Denial functions to protect the ego from things with which the individual cannot cope. While this may save us from anxiety or pain, denial also requires a substantial investment of energy. Because of this, other defenses are also used to keep these unacceptable feelings from conscious awareness.

Displacement

Displacement is considered to be a neurotic mechanism, which means it is always negative and may take a toll on your relationships. When displacement is used, your aggressive impulses are directed to an unthreatening target that has nothing to do with whatever made you upset. For example, you may start a fight with your spouse after having a hard day at work, or you may yell at your children because you are upset with your spouse. The displacement technique is different from sublimation. When sublimation is used, your negative emotions are transformed into something positive. For example, if you are going for a run to get rid of anger, you are using the sublimation technique.

Regression

Psychological regression is a childish way of dealing with challenges. For example, an adolescent who is overwhelmed with fear, anger, and growing sexual impulses might become clingy and start exhibiting earlier childhood behaviors he has long since overcome, such as bedwetting. An adult may regress when under a great deal of stress, refusing to leave their bed and engage in normal, everyday activities. Drinking, overeating and other forms of escapism are all examples of regression. The problem with regression is that you may regret letting your childish behavior become self-destructive, and this can lead to far more serious problems.

Compensation

Psychological compensation is an attempt to compensate for real or imagined flaws in one area by excelling in another area. For example, someone who fails academically may compensate by becoming a great athlete, or someone who is physically weak may compensate by concentrating on their studies or career. Unattractive people may compensate by becoming great lovers and / or attentive partners. Compensation may be positive or negative. While positive compensation helps overcome challenges, negative compensation increases feeling of inferiority.

Projection

Projection is a coping technique that helps reduce anxiety by attributing unacceptable behavior to somebody else. For example, your spouse may accuse you in being mean and not letting them talk while in reality it’s your spouse who doesn’t let you talk. Another example would be when you dislike someone without any obvious reason. To reduce your anxiety and justify your feelings, you start thinking that it’s that person who doesn’t like you in the first place. In extreme cases, people who use this defense mechanism may appear paranoid. They will display extreme distrust of others and build conspiracy theories.

Repression

Psychological repression is unconscious attempt to repel negative feelings as if they didn’t exist. People who use repression as their predominant strategy typically are not aware of their own emotional situation and feelings. Sometimes they will not have any recollection of traumatic events that undoubtedly happened whatsoever. Repression is slightly different from suppression. While repression is an unconscious process, suppression is a conscious blocking of impulses and emotions.

Intellectualization

Psychological intellectualization is an attempt to deal with frustration and anxiety by leaving our emotions behind and concentrating on rational analysis of upsetting events. An example of this would be a patient diagnosed with a serious illness who deals with his anxiety by reading everything he can find about his diagnosis. People who tend to use intellectualization may also use rationalization, another coping mechanism. The difference between intellectualization and rationalization is that rationalization typically involves minimizing the importance of upsetting events or giving excuses. 

Reaction formation

Reaction formation is probably the most interesting defense mechanism of all. Basically, reaction formation is converting your actual feelings to their exact opposite. For example, you may be so deeply in love that you feel extremely vulnerable. To get rid of anxiety, you begin to act as if you were indifferent to, or even hated the person you really love. Another example is when you behave overly friendly toward a person who you secretly dislike. The key to reaction formation is exaggeration and compulsiveness. Needless to say, reaction formation is not a healthy way of dealing with emotional problems